Overland

  • Details

    Width: 3"

    Length:
    • Standard - adjusts from 45" – 54"
    • Long - adjusts from 54" – 63"

    All Anthology guitar and bass straps are hand-made with the absolute finest quality full-grain leathers in the world. Our leathers are chosen for their ability to fully distribute the weight of the guitar across the strap, for a more comfortable playing experience on those long gigs.

    Our straps are not only great looking; they're also super-comfortable. Between a top layer of rugged full-grain leather, and a bottom layer of ultra-soft full-grain leather, we use a high-density, premium padding, to maximize comfort without sacrificing strength.

    Even better, we use only the strongest industrial grade threads, the same threads used to make parachutes and airbags. That's strength you can trust.

    To top it off, our leather burnishes and beautifies with use. All of our straps have their natural marks, scrapes and scars, which means they have loads of raw, rugged personality.

  • Size Chart:

    If you’re buying as a gift and don’t have access to measure the current strap, or you just can’t wait until you get home to take the measurement, there are several factors to consider:

    The main functional issue with respect to buying a guitar strap online is getting the length right. Our straps are measured from attachment hole to hole. The best way to determine your ideal length, or that of the musician you’re buying for, is to measure the previous strap. If you don’t have a strap to reference for whatever reason, we’ve assembled some general guidelines for length (supplemented with this friendly disclaimer: worry not if you still end up too long or short; we’re happy to facilitate an exchange for the right length).

    Elements to consider:

    1. Player height and weight:
    • In general, players who are 6’ and under, and average weight, should be fine with a standard length strap.
    • Players over 6’, or with more weight, could use a long strap.

    2. Electric or acoustic:
    • Because acoustic guitar bodies are deeper, guitar players 5’10” and over will likely prefer the long strap length.

    3. Placement of attachment pegs:
    • The strap attachment peg on the guitar can be in a couple of places. On some guitars the peg is at the top of the bout; on others, it’s placed where the guitar neck meets the body of the guitar. In the case of the latter, a few more inches will be needed, and a long strap might be the way to go.

    4. How low or high the player holds their guitar:
    • If the player is a gun-slinger, with the guitar down to his knees, an extra long strap might be needed.
    • If the player is a rocker, with their guitar a bit below the waist, a long strap might be the way to go.
    • If the player holds the guitar from the waist up, our standard length strap should do the trick.

  • Overland

    I’m glad the folks manning the cubicles are there. God bless ‘em. They keep the trains running on time.

    I just can’t join ‘em.

    The equation doesn’t add up for my balance sheet. How could I maximize the potential of my imaginative horizons pounding the same meager square footage of pavement day in and out? Given all the ground under that great sky, the concepts of romance and destiny wouldn’t have much heft if confined to the girl next door. Yes, time is the only absolute boundary in this world, and with so little sand in the hourglass next to so much world, I need to spend my time ever moving.

    Granted, it’s not a discovery shared by many, but the greatest thing I’ve found is the desire to never stop searching. Art, like life, is momentum. Whether a brush on a canvas or the vibrations of a string pushing molecules through the air, it’s all movement; energy collected and released.

    Most people are taught to think in terms of inspiration coming to them, but without a journey there is nothing for the page or the stage. You have to go to the inspiration as sure as the earth revolves around the sun. After all, writing a song isn’t what happens in a room somewhere. That’s just the transcribing, the unpacking of what a broken heart or triumphant struggle collected out there.

    Even before I fully grasped that immutable law of nature there was always a restless energy stirring in me, an inner metronome I couldn’t shut off. People tend to harbor hostility for the wanderer, for all the wayward sons and dreamers like myself, but they forget how much human progress has hinged on explorers and their unquenchable yearning to seek. Comfort and routine have their place, sure, but not in the pantheon of mortal achievement (sorry, inventor of the Snuggie) — and most definitely not in terms of pushing boundaries and leaving a lasting mark on music.

    That’s why there’s never been anything aimless about my aimless wandering. I can hold a job. I’ve held more than most, in fact. I just don’t believe in holding one long enough to let it hold me. And you can rest assured, when all my wandering time is up, I won’t have regrets about where I didn’t go, what I didn’t do, what I didn’t see, taste, hear, and feel. My songs will all have been lived as well as written.

    And, with a little wayward luck, they may even be sung long after my journey takes me from this world to the next.


Collections: Guitar Straps, Guitarists




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